Denmark has committed 945 million DKK in support of Uganda’s National Development Plan

The Danish Ambassador to Uganda and Uganda’s Minister of Finance, Hon. Kasaija, entered into a new five-year partnership for 2018-2022. Denmark has committed 945 million DKK in support of Uganda’s National Development Plan to the benefit of the Ugandan people.

The partnership has three objectives: 1) Contribute to poverty reduction through inclusive and sustainable economic development; 2) Promote democracy, good governance and human rights and 3) Support Uganda’s stabilizing role in the region. Support will be provided through eight engagement partners, namely Inspectorate of Government, Financial Management and Accountability Programme, Agricultural Business Initiative, TradeMark East Africa, Northern Uganda Resilience Initiative, Democratic Governance Facility – DGF, UNFPA Uganda and Acholi Religious Leaders Peace Initiative (ARLPI).

Danish company fueling a cleaner future in Uganda

 

C F Nielsen looking to turn everyday food waste into a usable and more sustainable energy source

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C F Nielsen, a small company from north Jutland, is developing a machine that can turn everyday food waste into a usable and more sustainable form of fuel that can be used for cooking.

The plan is to try it out next year in Kampala, Uganda, which – like many other developing nations – is heavily reliant on wood and coal as energy sources, much to the detriment of the surrounding environment and forest ecosystems.

“We need to stop the deforestation,” Mogens Slot Knudsen, the head of C F Nielsen, told DR Nyheder.

“What we do here is use waste products from agriculture or other areas, so people don’t need to chop down trees and forests.”

Waste to fuel
Through the process of ‘briquetting’ – a process in which raw materials are compressed under high pressure to form a round or square briquette – the company produces small blocks of material that can be used for heating purposes.

Anything from corn stalks, both peanut shells and sugar cane refuse can be transformed into an alternative for other unsustainable fuel sources.

The new briquette machine has been helped along via the support of Access 2 innovation, a collection of civil organisations, companies, research centers and authorities dedicated to generating sustainable projects and solutions abroad.

Business Delegation from Nordic Countries

Business delegation taking part in the cultural dance at carnival

Business delegation from Denmark, Iceland and Sweden were in Uganda since 19th of November to 28 Nov 2017 exploring business opportunities in areas of; Agribusiness, IT, renewable energy, Infrastructure and hospitality.  The projects in which they have shown interest include but not limited to: – Jinja/Kampala express way, BRT in Kampala, Solar power generation for off grids to rural communities of at least 10mws, waste to energy production, sustainable accommodation in some of the National parks etc.

The delegation paid a courtesy call on the Rt. Hon. Prime Minister, Minister for Finance, Planning and Economic Development, had a meeting with Executive Director Professor Kwesiga Uganda Industrial Research Institute, Uganda Manufactures Association officials, Ministry of Energy Officials, Local businessmen in their line of interest, Uganda Investment Authority to mention but a few and paid a courtesy call on H.E the President. The delegation toured the Murchison Falls National Park. They were introduced to the best Cultural Experience around Kampala at the Capitol Palace Hotel and the Carnivore Restaurant.


Group Photo with Minister for Finance, Planning and Economic Development

Executive Director  Uganda Industrial Research Institute Professor Charles Kwesiga (fourth from right) with H.E Kibedi Zaake and the Delegation from the Nordics.

 

They were introduced to the best cultural experience around Kampala at the carnivore Restaurant

 

Some members of the business delegation telling stories around the fire place at Twiga Lodge in Murchision Falls National Park.

Growing number of kids in Denmark change their gender

MODELFOTO 2011 af unge piger- - Se RB 28/12 2016 07.21. I januar gjorde Sexologisk Klinik i København det muligt for transkønnede unge at komme i hormonbehandling, inden de var fyldt 18 år. (Foto: Stig Nørhald/Scanpix 2016)

MODELFOTO 2011 af unge piger- – Se RB 28/12 2016 07.21. I januar gjorde Sexologisk Klinik i København det muligt for transkønnede unge at komme i hormonbehandling, inden de var fyldt 18 år. (Foto: Stig Nørhald/Scanpix 2016)

More than twice as many minors as expected have expressed a desire to change their gender this year.

Since January, the Sexology Clinic in Copenhagen has offered hormone treatment to minors who feel like they were born in the wrong body.
The clinic anticipated that around 50 minors would take advantage of opportunity to change their gender, but that number was surpassed in just six months and the annual estimate was increased to 130, news agency Ritzau reported on Wednesday.
In Denmark, children as young as 12 can receive hormone suppressors, also known as puberty blockers, to stunt the growth of sexual organs and suppress developments like facial hair for boys and menstruation for girls. The effects of the blockers are reversible.
Once minors reach the age of 16, they can receive full hormone treatment that is largely irreversible.
The demand for gender changes amongst children does not come as a surprise to LGBT Danmark, the national organization for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex people.

Danish women top cancer stats in the Nordics

cancer
They are more often diagnosed with breast and lung cancer than their counterparts in Sweden, Norway and Finland

Danish women are more frequently diagnosed with cancer than their counterparts in other Nordic countries, reveals an analysis from the National Institute of Public Health (SDU).

In 2013, some 653 Danish women out of 100,000 were diagnosed with cancer, which is 26 percent more than in Finland and Sweden, and 10 percent more than in Norway.

Danish women rank high for most types of cancer, but top the statistics for breast and lung cancer.